How To Treat Your Child’s Fever

So if a fever isn’t dangerous, what’s the point in treating it? In truth it’s all about keeping your child comfortable. Many doctors don’t recommend any treatment at all for temperatures under 102 degrees, but if your child is shivering under a blanket or has blue lips, there’s nothing wrong with FEVERfevertreating. The most important part of treating a fever is to avoid overdosing your child with medicine!

The two medications approved for treating childhood fever are acetaminophen as in Pediacare® Fever Reducer and ibuprofen as in Pediacare® Fever Reducer IB.

The two medications approved for treating childhood fever are acetaminophen as in Pediacare® Fever Reducer and ibuprofen as in Pediacare® Fever Reducer IB. There is no one best medication for every child, so if you notice that your child seems to respond better to one medicine than another, use that one! Since a fever isn’t going to hurt your child, you don’t need to alternate the medications in an effort to make sure her temperature stays down. That said, the two medications are in different classes, so if one doesn’t seem to help her after a couple of hours it’s safe to try the other. Do take a moment to write down the name, the time and the dose you gave so that you don’t end up accidentally doubling up.

Your child’s weight determines the correct dose of fever-reducer to give. If her weight is not listed on the packaging, check with her doctor or a pharmacist to make sure you’re giving a safe dose. Acetaminophen now comes in one standard concentration of 160 mg per 5 ml, so if you run across an old bottle of “infant’s” acetaminophen that says 80 mg per 0.8 ml it’s a good idea to dispose of it and replace it with a newer product.

Acetaminophen is usually dosed every 4-6 hours while ibuprofen is given every 6-8 hours. Remember, your goal is not to overdose your child, so resist the temptation to give the medication sooner than scheduled.

Tepid baths can also help bring down a child’s temperature, but remember again that all you’re trying to do is to make your child more comfortable, so the bath shouldn’t be unpleasantly cool or prolonged.

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Tepid baths can also help bring down a child’s temperature, but remember again that all you’re trying to do is to make your child more comfortable, so the bath shouldn’t be unpleasantly cool or prolonged. If your child is shivering in the tub, it’s time to wrap him/her in a nice warm towel and get him/her some soft pajamas.

Finally, remember that there’s rarely a wrong time to call your doctor when you’re worried about your child’s health. We should always be able to provide you with reasonable guidelines and advice to help you out. Answering your questions and making sure your child is safe is our job, and we enjoy it. As for getting you through that first day of Driver’s Ed, I’m afraid you’re on your own.

 

Dr. Hill is a paid endorser for PediaCare®.  His thoughts and opinions do not necessarily reflect those of the brand or of Prestige Brands, Inc.

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